125 YEARS AGO

January 7, 1893: The Ladies’ Aid Society of the Presbyterian church will give an Experience Social in the new church on Friday evening, January 13, 1893. There will be music and singing, after which each member of the Aid Society will give her experience in earning a dollar for the building fund. The social will be something new for Elko, and there will undoubtedly be a large crowd in attendance. There will be no admission fee, but a collection will be taken up. A cordial invitation extended to all.

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The Tuscarora Times-Review has the following to say of the new Deputy Sheriff. J.M. Mateer, who for the four years past has creditably filled the office of Constable of Tuscarora township, left for Elko yesterday to accept the position of deputy under Sheriff Henderson. Sober, intelligent, of good habits and a familiarity with the duties of the office, his selection cannot but be pronounced an excellent one.

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The new Board of County Commissioners met Monday, Jan. 2, 1893, pursuant to law. Present — Messrs. McAfee, Wilson and Rigby. In accordance with a petition of the citizens of Fort Halleck, the Board instructed the District Attorney to notify one McIntire to cease destroying the public highway and mail road running from Halleck to Fort Halleck.

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The ice harvest — stopped by the warm weather just after Christmas — has commenced again, and some fine ice is coming in.

1OO YEARS AGO

January 7, 1918: Tax Collector Miller this morning reported that he collected last week, $51,401.21. But this morning, up to 10 o’clock he had taken in over $150,000 and anticipated more to come, as this is the last day when taxes can be paid, and many of the big corporations are paying up.

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The city council is in session this afternoon to take action on the matter of quarantine to check the present scarlet fever epidemic. It has reached such a point that prompt and energetic action must be taken in order to check the further spread of the fever. There are nine cases now under quarantine in the city and the physicians say they fear a further spread of the disease unless a rigid and drastic quarantine be put in place.

January 9, 1918: What is known as the Humboldt Forest, comprising the Humboldt, lying in the northern part of Elko county, Ruby forest, lying in the southern part of the county, and the Santa Rosa, in the extreme north eastern part of Humboldt county, just across the Elko county line, is attracting a great deal of attention just at present on account of its rich grazing facilities, caused by the announcement by the government of the number of stock to be allowed to graze in 1918. While there are two other forests in the United States that are larger in area than the Humboldt, there will be more than twice the head of stock on the Elko forests than on any of the others. The allotment this year will total 418,250 sheep, cattle and horses, divided between the three forests, the Humboldt leading with 315,750, Ruby next with 54,000 and Santa Rosa with 48,500.

75 YEARS AGO

January 7, 1943: An unavailing search continued here today for the missing United States bomber, which left Wendover field Saturday morning. It reported ten minutes later and has not been heard from since. The ship was bound for Elko. Ground crews of the Civil Air Patrol left for the North Fork area today, where a snow slide was reported and for the southeast section of the Ruby Mountains.

January 8, 1943: Thirty knives had been added to the collection in the Elko Daily Free Press office today as enthusiastic Elko residents brought their prized blades in and added them to the collection. “We might not be able to be there, but at least we can send something to help,” was the sentiment expressed.

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After flying more than 8,000 miles in separate flights, using the Elko airport as a base of operations, members of the Civil Air Patrol abandoned the search for the missing United States bomber from Wendover Field today.

January 13, 1943: Nevada state employees are to work 38 instead of 33 hours a week, it was announced by Gov. E.P. Carville today. The move has been taken voluntarily by workers after a conference of department heads with the governor. The action was necessary to avoid hiring additional help. Governor Carville said that industry of the nation is working 40 hours and workers and officials felt the change was only right from a patriotic and economic standpoint.

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1943 license plates for autos are going slowly, according to W.M. Weathers, assessor of Elko county. The plates are tiny ones this year, just large enough to superimpose “43” over last year’s date. The background is in red and the numerals in yellow.

50 YEARS AGO

January 8, 1968: An abrupt transition from the late, wet spring weather to the normal dryness of summer during 1967 was followed by an equally dry fall. During the final quarter of the year, precipitation averaged about half of normal. The Lamoille Canyon power house reports 37 per cent of normal snow pack. Cover is only fair at the upper elevations, and there is practically no snow in the lower valleys. Nevada’s 1868 water supply outlook ranges from “below averages” on the Owyhee and Humboldt drainages.

January 10, 1968: A group of interested members of the Citizen’s Committee for the passage of the school bond appeared before the Elko County School Board last night and expressed some dissatisfaction over the proposed new physical education facility for Elko High School. The group — whose basic feeling was that if 3,500 seats in the gymnasium was the right figure for the bond issue then 3,500 seats is the right figure now and no cuts in the seating capacity should be made — discussed the issue at great lengths with the board members.

January 11, 1968: The burned-out wreckage of a Marine Corps transport plane carrying 18 persons was sighted today on a snowclad Nevada mountain. There was no sign of survivors. The four-engine C54 transport crashed Wednesday after the pilot radioed the craft was “dropping fast” because of ice on its wings. The wreckage was sighted shortly after dawn by a military search plane. The pilot radioed that the stricken craft had crashed and ploughed through the snow and burned on 9,779 foot high Mt. Tobin in a desolate area near Battle Mountain. The mountain is about 40 miles southwest of Battle Mountain.

25 YEARS AGO

January 8, 1993: Snow falling yesterday added six inches to the six inches that fell prior to 10 a.m. yesterday. After a brief respite, the snow had begun falling again early in the afternoon. Elko airport reopened at 11 a.m. today, City Manager Lorey Lipparelli said, after being closed for 39 hours. So far this winter, 36.9 inches of snow has fallen on the airport measuring station. While that seems a lot, weatherman Gerald Miles said it is still short of the 30-year average of 38.8 inches for this time of year.

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Elko County Commissioners have scheduled a public meeting on a proposed interim land use plan. The purpose of a plan is to force federal and state agencies to consider the county’s wishes before adopting land-use regulations locally. Commissioners have also scheduled a meeting for Feb. 18 to solicit views on how many additional acres, if any, should be set aside in Elko County for wilderness.

January 9, 1993: Snow shovels are the hottest commodity in Elko today, and all the stores surveyed yesterday were sold out of them, tire chains were also in short supply. The latest snowfall, which dumped a foot of snow on Elko this week, was also keeping private snowplow contractors working around the clock. Builder’s Mart sold 42 snow shovels in half an hour yesterday and employees were calling warehouses to try to locate more shovels.

January 12, 1993: The total valuation for county building permits in 1992 tumbled to its lowest level in years, County Engineer Mike Murphy reported, adding the totals reflect a return to normal growth following the mining boom of the late 1980s.

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