125 YEARS AGO

February 4, 1893: The idea of bonding Elko School District in the sum of $3,000 for the purpose of building an additional room on to the school house, is a good one and will undoubtedly meet with the approval of everybody in the district.

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The Depot Hotel has changed hands, Johnny Abel having purchased the interest of James Clark in the business. The new firm will undoubtedly be as popular as the old one, both members of it have a host of friends in Eastern Nevada. Everybody in this section knows Johnny Abel and he and Henderson Green make a strong team. Both will be on deck at the Hotel to see to the wants of their guests. Drop in and see them.

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W.F. Ross, whose death was announced in our last issue, was one of the most prominent citizens of Elko county, having been engaged in the cattle and sheep business, with headquarters at Mountain City for many years. He had accumulated quite a large property and left an estate estimated at from $100,000 to $150,000. Deceased was a native of Pennsylvania, aged 53 years. In his will Mr. Ross left $1,000 to the Presbyterian church of Elko and $500 to the Sunday School.

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A bill has been introduced in the Legislature to repeal the coyote and lynx bounty law.

100 YEARS AGO

February 4, 1918: The local board this forenoon examined 23 men of class one for their physical condition, 15 passing, six being referred to the advisory medical board, one being passed for limited military service and but one failing. Among the local boys who passed today were Karl and Oliver Grover and Henry G. Witt.

February 5, 1918: Mr. and Mrs. G.S. Garcia, who have been in California for some time, have returned home. Mr. Garcia says that he made a mistake when he went to California to spend the winter, as he finds we are having finer weather here than the “land of sunshine and roses” is enjoying. It is very dry there, he says, and the stock is dying fast from want of feed, and in many cases the sheep owners are killing the lambs as fast as they are born in order to save the ewes.

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The annual masquerade ball at the Bradley which formerly has been held on the 22nd of February, will be held on the 21st of this month, so as not to conflict with the dedication exercises of the new high school. This will give everyone a chance to attend both affairs.

February 7, 1918: Again Elko county is “over the top” in filling its quota called for by the National Red Cross. On January 18th a letter was received asking for 500 pillows for the soldiers in service and this shipment was made by the women of Elko county on last Saturday. These pillows were covered with white cloth. Today they have an additional 500 pillows ready for shipment, covered with colored cloth, for use in the hospitals.

75 YEARS AGO

February 5, 1943: Transcontinental traffic was resumed over the North Fork today, upon the completion of a temporary bridge at noon by the Nevada highway department. The temporary bridge was constructed below the one which was washed-out Saturday, Jan. 23, across Route 40, about 18 miles east of Elko. A number of piles had to be driven for its construction and the work was done under severe weather conditions. It is expected that the Burlington bus lines, which transferred their operations to Route 50 will now return to Route 40, which is the shortest route across the state of Nevada and which is generally recognized as the “main line.”

February 8, 1943: The knives that were donated by Elko County people in the Elko Daily Free Press campaign are already making history. A great group of knives are pictured in the February 8th issue of Life and some of the Elko county knives have been recognized in the picture, with the caption “Save a Life with a Knife.” The box in which the knives were sent from Elko is shown with several copies of the Elko Daily Free Press upon it. The three foot blade, contributed by Phil Thomas, in a leather sheath, is leaning against the box. Its identification is positive as the number 13 is discernable on the scabbard. The bayonet brought in by Mrs. Ray Pease and a knife in a hand-made holster, donated by Philip Aranguena, are also easy to identify.

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Beginning Sunday shoes were rationed throughout the nation, according to an official announcement received by Mayor David Dotta, head of the local rationing board. Exceptions to the rule were waterproof rubber footwear, soft and hard soled house and boudoir slippers, soft soled infant and ballet slippers. Consumers cannot buy rationed shoes until Tuesday, Feb. 9th. The consumer must then present and the trade must collect stamp No. 17 from War Ration Book one. This stamp is good for one pair of any kind of rationed shoes through June 15, and is transferable between members of a family living in the same household.

50 YEARS AGO

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February 7, 1968: A delegation of Elkoans today traveled to Carson City to meet with members of the state legislature to discuss the status of Elko’s Nevada Community College. Those making the trip included Dr. Gene Voris, president of the college, and members of the school’s advisory board: Mike Marfisi, chairman, Mark Chilton, Dr. Hugh Collett, Bill Wunderlich and Paul Sawyer.

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The 1968 water supply outlook for the Humboldt and upper Owyhee River basins is well below average as of Feb. 1, according to Bob L. Whaley, snow survey supervisor for the USDA Soil Conservation Service in Reno. Storms around the end of January helped improve the snow pack but failed to raise it to the 15-year average (1948-62) on most snow courses.

February 9, 1968: The Assembly Ways and Means Committee Thursday recommended passage of a bill to create a community college in Elko as a pilot program. The vote was unanimous and was the first major piece of legislation to move past committee in the 1968 special session of the legislature.

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Members of the Elko County Fair and Recreation Board last night adopted a resolution to substantially alter the organization of the board. The principal effect of the change, planned to go into effect on March 1, will be to give individual communities autonomy in the collection and administration of the five percent room tax presently administered by the county board.

25 YEARS AGO

February 4, 1993: Letters and phone calls protesting Gov. Bob Miller’s proposal to close seven honor camps, including those in Wells and Carlin, have been pouring into the offices of the state lawmakers representing this area. “I’m getting faxes, letters and phone calls from all over the district and all against the closing,” state Sen. Dean Rhoads said yesterday. Assemblyman John Carpenter also reported yesterday that he is receiving calls and letters about the camps, “and I have heard one person say we should close them.” Gov. Miller’s proposed budget calls for closing the camps at Carlin, Wells, Pioche, Ely, Winnemucca, Jean and Tonopah to save $6 million.

February 6, 1993: Long-time Elko veterinarian Dr. Richard J. Bergin has retired and sold his animal clinic to Dr. Mark Grinsell, and Dr. Robert Finley has joined Grinsell at the clinic. Bergin came to this area in 1958, purchasing the mixed animal practice of Dr. C.H. Kennedy. Grinsell joined the clinic three years ago, but had been in Elko five years, coming from Napa, Calif. Finley, a native of Helena, Mont., came to work for the clinic in December of last year, bringing four years of experience.

February 10, 1993: With only eight months remaining before tough new federal landfill regulations go into effect, Elko City Councilmen last night authorized Public Works Director Charles Williams to spend up to $10,000 to investigate whether the city should maintain its present landfill or open another one. Williams estimated the current landfill has a maximum life of seven to ten years more.

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