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Build a wood yard shed
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Build a wood yard shed

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A wooden storage shed is a great addition to your property, especially for storage.

A wooden storage shed is a handsome addition to property, whether it’s for lawn equipment, outdoor gear or just stuff you and your family accumulated. You can buy a shed ready-made and delivered, buy a kit to assemble one yourself, or take the custom route with a custom design (the priciest option). However it’s made, a wooden yard shed can solve storage problems and be a nice addition to the landscape.

A carpenter will charge $3,370 to construct a wood paneled 10-foot-by-12-foot storage building with 800 cubic feet of space, a cement foundation and shingle roof. A homeowner with carpentry experience and tools can buy a shed kit and materials for the foundation and roof for $1,500 and build it, saving 55%. The job involves siting the location to make it level, pouring a cement foundation, building and erecting the walls and roof assembly, and installing the door, trim and handle. Then the siding and door need a coat of primer and paint and the roof needs shingles to complete the job. The price varies considerably for a custom-designed wood shed, depending on the size and complexity of the structure.

You may also check out sheds at a home center or a local lumber yard. A completed 10-foot-by-12-foot unpainted shed costs about $2,400 delivered.

Before you build anything on your property, call the local building department to find out if a permit is required; in most areas it will be.

To find more DIY project costs and to post comments and questions, visit www.diyornot.com.

Pro Cost — DIY Cost — Pro time — DIY Time — DIY Savings — Percent Saved

$3,370 — $1,500 — 41.8 — 60.0 — $1,870 — 55%

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