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125 YEARS AGO

April 7, 1894: The late storms were rough on sheep grazing on the ranges south of Elko. Mitchell and Lindsay both lost quite heavily.

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Through the foresight of Prof. T.N. Stone, Principal of the Tuscarora school, the pupils of that town have prepared and forwarded a most excellent exhibit of their work to the Midwinter Fair. Their work is above the average and far ahead of any that we observed in the California exhibits of the same kind.

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T.K. Stewart of Reno, and E.C. McClellan of Elko, have formed a partnership, with offices at Elko and Reno. Both are first-class surveyors and civil engineers, and will make a strong team.

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The Tuscarora road has been pretty bad during the past week, caused by the melting snow. The stage while being taken around a high bluff in Taylor canyon, where the road was a running stream, Tuesday night, turned over three times. The passengers walked over the knoll.

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The Justice Court has done a thriving business this week. Chicken stealing cases and knock down arrests, together with assault and battery trial, would cause one to think that Elko was booming.

100 YEARS AGO

April 7, 1919: Last Friday Game Warden Bachman arrested three men, two Indians and one of the ranchers near Deeth, for killing beaver and shipping their hides. They appeared before Justice of the Peace Armstrong and pleaded guilty and paid their fines. Mr. Bachman says the he has a list of other men in the county who have been charged with the same offense and expects to serve warrants on them in the course of the next few days. Who the parties are he refuses to say until after they have been apprehended.

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Rowland E. Winter, who has been in Reno taking the Pasteur treatment for rabies, returned this morning.

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A full force of men are now at work on the government shale plant just out of town, and the plant is expected to be in operation by the first of May.

April 9, 1919: A deal was closed the latter part of last week in which one of the best farms in Starr Valley changed hands, Will Goodale buying from James Riddell the ranch and livestock and machinery. Possession is to be given immediately and Mr. Riddell and family will move to Deeth, where they will make their home for the present. The purchase of this ranch gives Mr. Goodale one of the best ranches in the valley, as it adjoins his present farm on the east and north.

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The road between Elko and Tuscarora is opening up fast for auto travel and soon the reliable horses will be turned out to summer pasture while their places will be taken by the speedy motor truck. Roy Premieux has again the honor of driving the first car through the northern part of the county after the winter snows.

75 YEARS AGO

April 7, 1944: Members of the chemistry class at the Elko high school and their instructor Robert Best have been invited to attend the showing of “Madame Currie” at the Hunter theatre Sunday. The extraordinary film, starring Greer Carson and Walter Pidgeon plays here three nights.

April 10, 1944: “Jap fighting is fine,” William Keas, a member of the unmounted cavalry unit, which stormed Los Negros in the Admiraltys, writes his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Keas of Elko. The unit of which he is a member is referred to as one of the toughest fighting units operating for the United States.

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April 11, 1944: Boy Scout camping was the subject discussed by A.R. Torgerson, forest supervisor and chairman of camping in the Scout council, before members of the Elko Lions Club today, Plans are being made now for the camping program to be conducted at Lamoille camp this summer. Sgt. Alexander Puccinelli and Gunner’s Mate, 3/c, Pete Lesbo were club guests today.

50 YEARS AGO

April 7, 1969: Congressman Walter S. Baring said today he was pleased with the support he has received from Elko, Nevada residents in his fight to rescind the Environmental Special Service Administration’s February 5 order to close down 13 U.S. Weather Bureau offices, including the two-man office in Elko. There are several areas of Elko County that rely heavily on the bureau’s telephone recording service of weather information.

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Charles Paul Jr., Elko native who has returned to the area after a stint in California, undertakes his first business venture with the purchase of the retail portion of the Elko Shoe Shop. Announcement of the sale of the retail portion of the business to Paul by Mr. and Mrs. Jack Williams was made yesterday. The Williams’ will retain ownership of the shoe repair business. Paul is a 1963 graduate of BYU with a Bachelor of Science degree in business. He is a graduate of Elko High School.

April 9, 1969: Mayor Frank Weinrauch went on record as favoring lowering the speed limit imposed on trains passing through the city after taking issue with a Southern Pacific spokesman who told the city council Tuesday “You are just as dead at 45 miles per hour as at 60 or 70.” Trains currently pass through the downtown areas at 45 miles per hour, slowing down to 30 mph at the 4th St. crossing.

25 YEARS AGO

April 7, 1994: Elko City Planning Commissioners endorsed relocating the historic Tobar train depot onto city park property abutting 14th Street. The committee voted to approve the concept but asked that a site plan be returned at a later date for review. The Tobar building, built in 1910, is the only surviving Western Pacific train station in Nevada. It is currently located beside Battle Creek in Ruby Valley.

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A federal judge has ordered U.S. Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt to make a decision on Barrick Goldstrike Mines’ patent application by June 20, 10 months after the company filed suit against Babbitt. Barrick has been trying for a year and a half to win the patents, which would give the gold producer ownership of 1,792 acres at its mine sites north of Carlin. The patent would cover the Meikle underground mine now under construction as well as the Goldstrike open pit mine.

April 8, 1994: Elko County Commission Wednesday doled out $100,000 to the city airport to help fund a new air traffic control tower. The action followed an appeal from Elko Airport Advisory Board Chairman Tom Gallagher, who argues the tower was needed to avoid a potential deadly air collision. Gallagher said the airport has not control over then planes land or take off. Nor can the airport require from what direction planes arrive or depart. Under the current system, pilots may at their own discretion radio their intent to land or take off, but no regulations require pilots to warn other aircraft of their plans.

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