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Mystery Photo

Mystery Photo

Anyone able to identify this week’s mystery photo from the Northeastern Nevada Museum’s unidentified photo collection is asked to contact the museum at 738-3418, ext. 102, or archives@museumelko.org.

125 YEARS AGO

January 27, 1893: The Free Press has made arrangements to publish Foster’s weekly weather bulletin during the winter and spring months, and the forecasts will appear each week hereafter.

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George P. Robinson of Ruby Valley shipped four carloads of beef cattle to San Francisco from Halleck Thursday. He went below with them.

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The Elko postoffice yesterday received a supply of the old-style postage stamps.

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The new seats for the Presbyterian church have arrived.

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Charley Brossemer said he didn’t have time to stop for his mail while going by the postoffice the other day; his team had another lively streak just then, and never stopped until they passed the race track below town. He came back later for the Hot Springs mail.

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Quite a gathering of Elko county stockmen will be in San Francisco within the next few days. Among the number will be Henry Taber, Col. Moore, J. Haskins, Geo. Robinson, Ed Carville, J.J. Hylton, A.L. Cotant and Henry Voight.

100 YEARS AGO

January 28, 1919: The Lamoille Farm Bureau, organized last week, is circulating a petition which will be sent on to the legislature asking for an appropriation in the work of carrying on the campaign of extermination of the squirrel and rabbit pest, that has caused the loss of hundreds of thousands of dollars-worth of crops in the past few years.

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The Twentieth Century club announces that in their drive for books Saturday for the Elko public library, they collected 215 volumes. The ladies wish to thank the public for their contributions and for the encouragement they received.

January 29, 1919: It is reported that Elko is to have a second picture show, a lease on the old Gaity theater having been signed and the first show will be held next Saturday evening.

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Under the directions of the attorney general, Sheriff Harris has given notice to the local firms who have slot machines that they must remove the machines at once, and not only the slot machines but all card machines, punch boards and other devices in which the element of skill does not enter, are condemned by the sheriff.

January 31, 1919: C.H. Fredson, who is connected with the Elko Lamoille Power company says that he recently made a trip up the mountains back of the power house in the mouth of Lamoille canyon, and found the snow to be about 20 inches deep on the level. This is about a foot less than ordinary years. The company has finished their new reservoir, bring in the water from the main branch, which will insure them plenty of water for power next summer.

75 YEARS AGO

January 28, 1944: Announcement was made today by Toby Hammond that he had sold his interest in the Richfield station at the corner of Fourth and Idaho streets to Milt Smith, who takes immediate possession. He has been conducting the O.K. Tire Shop at the east end of town, and will handle both stations in connection with his tire shop. Mr. Hammond, who was inducted into the navy last week, leaves here for service next Tuesday.

January 31, 1944: The freight car for waste paper will be closed tonight—with sides bulging. Approximately 40 tons of paper was loaded into the car by mid-afternoon with loads of paper still piling in, and the door will be closed with the full car ready to be sent out tonight. Thirty-two tons almost filled the car this morning and since that time truck loads have come in from Starr Valley, Carlin, Beowawe, Battle Mountain, and Lamoille. A large load had arrived Friday from Mountain City. Fifteen hundred pounds of paper from Beowawe was collected by the Girl Scouts two years ago and had since been stored awaiting the scrap paper call.

February 2, 1944: Word has been received by Pete Bottari that his son John is again in active service, after some time spent in a hospital in North Africa recovering from the bite of an African flea. John is now a Sargeant, having completed his second year in the service.

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50 YEARS AGO

January 27, 1969: The go-ahead has been given to build 30 low-rent houses at the Southfork Indian Reservation and the Elko Indian Colony in Elko County, it was announced today by Rep. Walter Baring, D-Nev. The Indians help to build the houses, and thereby receive an equity in them. The prospective owners then make payments for a period of 15 to 20 years and obtain complete ownership. The amount of the payments is based on the ability of the prospective owners to pay. Baring said the Elko project will be under the direction of the Te-Moak Western Shoshone Housing Authority.

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Four members of Elko High School’s fine 1968 football team were named yesterday to the 1968 Nevada football all-state first team, compiled by the Nevada State Journal. Two of the gridders, Tim Gilligan and Rich Vasquez, were picked on the offensive squad and the other two, Mike Brown and Robin Meale, were selected to the defensive unit. In addition Gilligan was tabbed for “Back of the Year” honors in the “AA” division. Three other members of the Elko team were given honorable mention on the mythical squad. They were defensive end Jim Sustacha, guard-linebacker Francis Lostra, and two-way tackle Dennis Tate.

January 28, 1969: Last remnants of the old McIntyre Ranch, one of the preeminent cattle spreads of the 19th century in northern Nevada have been again gathered together with the sale of the Ruby Mountain Hereford Ranch by Louis and Dorothy Peterson to Frank and Phyllis Hooper. As a result of the transaction, recorded recently in Elko, the Hoopers now own virtually all of the ranching land owned Samuel G. McIntyre, a wealthy Utah miner who developed the McIntyre spread before the turn of the century, and two additional properties to boot.

25 YEARS AGO

January 27, 1994: Spring Creek High School was able to use its long-awaited gym for the first time last night when it hosted a wrestling match with Battle Mountain and Independence. The gym was accepted earlier yesterday by the school district in an agreement with the builders. Spring Creek’s four basketball teams host Battle Mountain on Friday night, and school officials invite the entire community to attend.

January 29, 1994: D’Orazio’s Italian Gardens, featuring Italian food, steaks and seafood, is now open in the former Gratton’s restaurant at 217 Idaho St. “We’re goin to make it a fun place to eat,” said one of the owners, Gary D’Orazio, who with his wife, Linda, also owns IGA Food and Drugs. They are in partnership in the restaurant with Gary’s brother, Sam, and his wife, Cindy. The four bought Gratton’s from Don and Coralee Miller and took it over last Saturday night.

——— Merilyn Sustacha of Lamoille was the winner of a custom-made saddle at the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association convention held in November in Elko. Sustacha is a Lamoille rancher who plans to “put the saddle to work and use it for a very long time.” Cliff Lynch of Double L Saddlery in Minden donated the saddle.

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Long-distance charges for telephone calls between the Elko area and phones in Carlin and the Lee-Jiggs area will end Monday, reminds Alltel. It will no longer be necessary to dial a “1” before calling Carlin’s 754 exchange or Lee-Jiggs 744 exchange.

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