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125 YEARS AGO

December 24, 1892: The ice harvest has commenced, and quite a number of men and teams are engaged on storing it for Summer.

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Valentine Walthers and son returned from the East Saturday. They report a great deal of sickness in Missouri, and both were ill while in that State. They were glad to get back to Nevada.

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On his last trip John Ainley brought in a small section of soil from his ranch in Pleasant Valley. It is going to the State University at Reno, where it will be analyzed and then sent, with soil from other parts of the State, to the World’s Fair.

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There is some difference in the weather now to what it was this time last year. Christmas morning, 1891, the ground was covered with a heavy coat of snow and the thermometer registered 26 below zero. This year there is no snow and the thermometer registers 37 above zero.

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The change in the weather during the past few days has interfered with the ice harvest. The ice put up the first two days was about eight inches thick and clear as crystal. That now coming in is quite soft.

100 YEARS AGO

The museum is missing the 1917 newspapers from the Elko Daily Free Press and there is no microfilm for October 1917 through December 1917. Sorry for the omission.

75 YEARS AGO

December 17, 1942: Members of Reed Post No. 7 occupied their quarters in the library building Monday night. While the post does not have a place to hold large banquets as in the past there are some compensating features in the new quarters, including furnace heat. The Boy Scouts can now occupy their quarters in the building also. Since the first at the Legion Hall eight months ago, the membership has been meeting at the Silver State Motor Company.

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Announcement was made by Mrs. Mary Comish, librarian, that books may now be withdrawn from the county library, the books having been returned to the newly renovated building from the Knights of Pythias hall, where they were moved following the fire in the former library building.

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Grammar school children are getting their pennies and nickels back into circulation, in keeping with the government’s program that this be accomplished immediately. An attempt was made to accomplish this last week and $290 worth of pennies were put back into circulation, while $108 in nickels went back into the regular avenues of trade. This means that 29,200 pennies are back “on the job” and 1080 nickels are at work again. Most of the money has gone into the purchase of War Stamps, Superintendent C.M. Luce declared today. Some of it has been turned into the banks.

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Elko has a genuine “milkmaid,” in the person of Mrs. Ethel Van-der-Dussen, who has accepted a position with the Glaser Milk company. She will have charge of the local delivery milk truck which delivers milk to the local residences throughout the city and will drive and make regular deliveries, relieving the present driver who has been called for service.

December 23, 1942: B.R. Stahmann, well-known trapper from Mountain City, is the winner of a Daily award for correct pelt preparation in the Fourteenth National Fur Show Marketing Service of Sears, Roebuck and Co. Stahmann’s carefully handled wolf pelt brought him one of the $5.00 daily awards, as a result of its being judged the best handled skin among all pelts received in Seattle on December 12 — and, in addition, entitles Stahmann to consideration for one of the major awards, including $1,000 first award, according in the final judging in April.

50 YEARS AGO

December 18, 1967: Cattle raced each other to bursting bales of hay dropping from the bellies of Air Force transport planes Sunday as the first phase of operation Haylift II appeared to be a success in northern Arizona. Officials say the mission may exceed Operation Haylift I which relieved starving animals in Utah and Nevada in February 1949. It took 41 sorties to drop 171 tons of feed to them in one of the worst storms ever to hit that area of the country.

December 20, 1967: A final parcel of mail, containing 18 pounds of mail when recovered, was found at the site of a Sonora Aviation plane crash last Sunday, Reno postal officials said. The mail had been thrown 70 feet ahead of the plane when it crashed on Dogskin Mountain north of Reno on Dec. 4. It was to be dried and processed through the postal system. The point of origin of the mail was not disclosed.

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The State Highway Board today approved plans for a $3.5 million project on Interstate 80 from six miles east of Deeth to 4.5 miles west of Wells in Elko County. The Highway Department is expected to advertise for bids in the first quarter of 1968. The seven-mile project will be another link on the Interstate 80 freeway system across Nevada.

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The last ton of gold ore has been roasted at the Getchell Mine, near Winnemucca, and the operation was closed down this week, leaving some 100 employees jobless at the height of the Christmas season. With the closing of the Getchell Mine, the number of gold mines in the United States is reduced to three, one Newmont Mining Corporation’s subsidiary, Carlin Gold Mining Co. north of Carlin, Homestake, another in Lead, and another in South Dakota, and a third in the state of Washington. The price of gold has remained constant at $35 an ounce since 1934, but at that time miners were paid $5 a day. Now, with fringe benefits, the pay has risen above $20 a day. Other cost increases have been commensurate. “Getchell is not out of ore,” said Paul Gemmill, executive secretary of the Nevada Mining Association. “They might have to dig deeper and do some remodeling, but this would be possible if the price of gold were commensurate with rising costs.”

December 21, 1967: J.W. (Tim) Monroe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Warren L. Monroe of Elko, has been appointed public information officer for the bureau of outdoor recreation, a Department of Interior agency, it was learned today. Monroe will be headquartered in the bureau’s Washing office and will have a staff of nine people to assist in carrying out the work of publicizing the outdoor recreation program.

25 YEARS AGO

December 24, 1992: Only dedication beyond the normal call of duty on the part of two city employees kept the planes landing at Elko airport last Thursday. Public Works Director Charles Williams told the Elko City Council Tuesday. After snowplows inadvertently buried the runway light, street department employee Craig Armuth and water department worker Keith Carr “physically” dug out the lights so planes could land. “They didn’t bat an eye, stepped out and just did it,” he added. Mayor Jim Polkinghorne said he would write a letter of commendation to praise the two employees. Williams also told the council that snow removal crews have been working 12-hour shifts to clear city streets since the recent storms.

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Elko officials signed a contract Tuesday to host the Babe Ruth Baseball 1993 Pacific Southwest Regional Tournament for 13-year-old players. The all-star tournament begins July 30 at Kump Field, with eight teams entered so far representing four states and Guam.

December 26, 1992: Maverick Country Stores Inc. plans to build a new store and gas station on the east side of Mountain City Highway across Spruce Road from Payless Shoes and Kmart. The store will be 2,200 square feet, “roughly 50 percent” larger than the Maverick Country Store on Idaho Street, and the gas islands will be the largest of any of the company’s 113 stores. There will be four islands under a canopy. Entrances to the store will be off Spruce Road and Mountain City Highway.

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More than 2,000 acres blackened by fire last summer in northeastern Nevada have been seeded in an effort to reestablish food plant species for wildlife according to Nevada Department of Wildlife. Approximately 38,000 acres of U.S. Forest Service lands and a small portion of NDOW property burned in August during the lightning-caused Coffeepot (Creek) fire north east of Elko. “Within the extensive burned area, 1,800 acres were identified as crucial to wildlife, mainly deer,” said Duane Erickson, NDOW habitat specialist. 200 acres of critical deer habitat on the eastern slope of the Ruby Mountains burned during the Dawley Creek Fire, were also seeded as part of the recent project.

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