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Construction has begun on an underground electrical transmission line that will bring Canadian hydropower to New York City as part of an effort to make the Big Apple less reliant on fossil fuels. State officials announced the start of construction Wednesday on the Champlain Hudson Power Express. Once complete, the line will stretch 339 miles (546 kilometers) through New York state to deliver power produced by the company Hydro-Québec. Authorities project the line will deliver enough clean energy to power more than one million homes while also cutting carbon emissions by 37 million metric tons.

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Waves of orange, glowing lava and ash blasted and billowed from the world’s largest active volcano and people on Hawaii’s Big Island have been warned to be ready if their communities are threatened. The ongoing eruption of Mauna Loa wasn’t immediately endangering nearby towns on Monday. But officials told residents to be ready in the event of a worst-case scenario. The U.S. Geological Survey says the eruption began late Sunday night in the volcano on the Big Island. Scientists had been on alert because of a recent spike in earthquakes at the summit of the volcano, which last erupted in 1984.

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NASA is canceling a planned satellite that was going to intensely monitor greenhouse gases over the Americas because it got too costly and complicated. But the space agency says it will still be watching human-caused carbon pollution but in different ways. Tuesday's NASA announcement says that its GeoCarb mission, which was designed to monitor carbon dioxide, methane and how plant life changes over North and South America is now looking to cost more than $600 million. It was budgeted at $166 million.

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Lava is shooting into the air and flowing downhill as Hawaii’s Mauna Loa volcano erupts for the first time in nearly 40 years. For now, lava is not threatening any homes or communities and no evacuation orders have been issued. Lava could eventually reach neighborhoods on the eastern side of the Big Island though it could take a week or more for molten rock to reach populated areas. Mauna Loa is spewing sulfur dioxide and other volcanic gases which combine with other particles to form volcanic smog, or vog. State health officials are urging people to cut back on outdoor exercise and other activities that cause heavy breathing.

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The Interior Department has proposed rules to limit methane leaks from oil and gas drilling on public lands. It's the latest action by the Biden administration to crack down on emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that contributes significantly to global warming. The proposal Monday by Interior’s Bureau of Land Management would tighten limits on gas flaring on federal land and require energy companies to better detect methane leaks. The actions follow a methane-reduction plan announced by President Joe Biden earlier this month. The plan targets the oil and gas industry for its role in global warming even as the president has pressed energy producers for more oil drilling.

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Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen has resigned as head of the ruling Democratic Progressive Party following local election losses suffered by her party. Tsai offered her resignation on Saturday evening, a tradition after a major loss, in a short speech in which she also thanked supporters. She said she will shoulder the responsibility as she had hand-picked candidates in Saturday’s elections. Voters in Taiwan overwhelmingly chose the opposition Nationalist party in several major races across the self-ruled island. Chiang Wan-an, the Nationalist party’s mayoral candidate, won the closely watched seat in capital Taipei. Lingering concerns about threats from rival China, which claims Taiwan as its territory, took a backseat to more local issues.

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On the southern edge of New Mexico’s largest city is a Hispanic neighborhood that used to be made up of a patchwork of family farms and quiet streets. Over the decades, industrial development has closed in, bringing with it pollution. Now residents have come up with a proposal for local regulators to consider as they fight for environmental justice. Modeled after regulations in New Jersey and Minnesota, the proposal for the Albuquerque metro area would call for health, environmental and equity impacts to be taken into account before regulators approve any new permits. Advocates also are hopeful their efforts will spark a statewide discussion about environmental justice.

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The head of Japan’s nuclear watchdog says regulators are considering revising a safety evaluation system to allow aging reactors to operate beyond the current 60-year limit, but that the move is aimed at preventing safety lapses and is not motivated by government efforts to increase use of nuclear power. The move has promoted mixed reactions from the public because of concerns over nuclear safety that rose sharply after the 2011 Fukushima nuclear plant disaster. Nuclear Regulation Authority Commissioner Shinya Yamanaka says its judgment in safety inspections is not affected by government policy. The government says Japan needs to consider all options in its energy mix, including nuclear, to curb emissions of greenhouse gases and secure a stable energy supply.

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The European Union’s climate chief criticized the outcomes of the meeting Sharm el-Sheikh, saying it was “not enough of a step forward for people and planet” and did “not address the yawning gap between climate science and our climate policies.” Frans Timmermans said the 27-nation bloc had supported the deal in order to ensure the creation of a loss and damage fund, but expressed disappointment that stronger language on cutting emissions hadn’t been agreed. “I urge you to acknowledge, when you walk out of this room, that we have all fallen short in actions to avoid and minimize loss and damage,” he said. “We should have done much more.”

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A vent at an underground natural gas storage well in Western Pennsylvania has been spewing massive amounts of planet-warming methane into the atmosphere for more than 11 days and attempts to plug the leak have thus far failed. Owner Equitrans Midstream says the well at its Rager Mountain storage facility, located in a rural area about 1.5 hours east of Pittsburgh, is venting about 100 million cubic feet of natural gas per day. If accurate, that would total 1.1 billion cubic feet in emissions so far, equal to the greenhouse gas emissions from burning 1,080 rail cars of coal. Pennsylvania environmental regulators issued the company notice of five potential violations of state law.

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U.S. climate envoy John Kerry is self-isolating after testing positive for COVID-19 at the U.N. climate talks in Egypt, a spokesperson said late Friday. Kerry is experiencing “mild symptoms” and is fully vaccinated and boosted. “He is working with his negotiations team and foreign counterparts by phone to ensure a successful outcome of COP27,” the statement read. Kerry has been attending the two-week talks at the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh which were due to end Friday but have gone into overtime.

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Global climate talks are headed to crunch time on the final scheduled day of negotiations. Many expect that negotiators will go past their deadline as chances of a deal still looked unclear. A new draft cover decision from the Egyptian presidency came out Friday morning, half the size of Thursday’s 20-page document that was criticized for being vague and bloated. But this new 10-page one still has little new compared to previous years and plenty of places with yet-to-be-decided options. And some of the most talked about proposals, from the European Union, Barbados and India aren’t in it, reflecting the Egyptian presidency’s priorities.

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High energy prices linked to Russia's war in Ukraine have paved the way for coal’s comeback in some parts of Europe. Many people have turned to coal as a cheaper option than natural gas, , endangering climate goals and threatening health from increased pollution. The trend raises worries in a region of northeastern Czech Republic that has worked for decades to end its industrial legacy as the most polluted area of the country. The country's production of brown coal — the cheapest form — has risen by more than 20% in the first nine months of 2022 over a year earlier. Officials say that's the first increase after almost a continuous decades-long decline.

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A senior Human Rights Watch official slammed the Egyptian government’s human and environmental rights record, saying that the space for environmental activism in Egypt “is severely curtailed.” Richard Pearshouse, director of environment and human rights at HRW, said environmental activists in Egypt have faced “constant harassment” by security forces including restrictions on travel, foreign funding, and research permits. He said that such restrictions bar public debate and research on damages caused by business, agro-industry, cement factories and other businesses linked to the military.

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Years in the works, a massive petrochemical refinery in western Pennsylvania fed by the vast natural gas reservoir underneath Appalachia is fully operational. Oil and gas giant Shell plc said Tuesday that the refinery will produce 3.5 billion pounds of polyethylene annually when it ramps up to full production by the second half of 2023. It is built on the site of a former zinc smelter along the Ohio River some 30 miles northwest of Pittsburgh. The refinery produces ethylene, which is used to produce everything from plastics to tires to antifreeze. Environmental advocacy groups predict that it'll generate more plastic pollution, compounds that form smog and planet-warming greenhouse gases.

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African nations want to increase how much money they receive from schemes that offset greenhouse gas emissions and are looking for ways to address the issue at U.N. climate talks currently underway in Egypt. Carbon offsets, where polluters can effectively cancel out their emissions by paying into initiatives such as tree-planting, are currently cheaper to purchase in Africa than in many other parts of the world where schemes are more strictly regulated. African nations are looking to the climate talks to get a better price on the ‘carbon market’ to help achieve their own emissions reductions targets and move toward clean energy.

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Saudi Arabia’s vision of an environmentally friendly future is on display just a short drive from the venue of the U.N. climate summit being held in Egypt. What’s not highlighted in the glossy gallery are the earth-warming fossil fuels that the country continues to pump out of the ground for global export. In and around the conference, Saudi Arabia is presenting itself as a leader in green energies and eco-friendly practices. The country wants to be part of the transition to renewable energies while holding on to its role as the top global crude oil exporter. That vision is sharply contested by climate scientists and environmental experts, who argue that Saudi Arabia and other oil-rich countries simply want to distract the world to continue with business as usual.

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As the U.N. climate talks in Egypt reached the half-way point, negotiators are still working on draft agreements before ministers arrive next week to push for a substantial deal at the end. The two-week meeting in Sharm el-Sheikh started with strong appeals from world leaders for greater efforts to curb greenhouse gas emissions and provide more financial help for poor nations cope with global warming. Scientists say the amount of greenhouse gases being pumped into the atmosphere needs to be halved by 2030 to meet the goals of the Paris climate accord. But a major group of countries that includes oil-and-gas exporting nations has pushed back against explicit references to keeping the target of limiting global warming under 1.5 degrees Celsius.

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President Joe Biden says “it's more urgent than ever” to increase commitments to fighting global warming. He says new spending on clean energy initiatives has cemented the United States' role in the effort. Biden commented Friday in a speech at the annual United Nations climate conference being held in Egypt. Biden is likely to face questions about how far the U.S. will go to pull along other large greenhouse gas emitters. The Democratic president's attendance at the conference was his first stop on an around-the-world trip. He's also going to Cambodia for a meeting of Southeast Asian leaders and to Indonesia for a Group of 20 summit meeting.

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A Norwegian company will build a giant electric battery factory just southwest of Atlanta. Freyr Battery announced Friday that it would invest $2.6 billion over multiple phases, hiring 720 people. The plant's announced capacity would be the second-largest worldwide, among operating facilities, behind a factory owned by Panasonic and Tesla in Nevada. Freyr CEO Tom Jensen says the company’s vision of using renewable energy to make batteries could play an important role in reducing carbon emissions from electricity generation and transportation. Freyr says it sees opportunities in the United States in part because of incentives for renewable energy passed by Congress earlier this year. Freyr says it is getting “strong” incentives from state and local governments.

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The Biden administration has ramped up efforts to reduce methane emissions, targeting the oil and gas industry for its role in global warming even as President Joe Biden has pressed energy producers for more oil drilling to lower prices at the gasoline pump. At a global climate conference in Egypt on Friday, Biden announced a supplemental rule cracking down on emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The new Environmental Protection Agency rule follows up on a methane rule the Democratic president announced last year. The American Exploration and Production Council represents the largest independent oil and gas companies in the U.S. and says it appreciates changes made by the EPA.

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The nation’s largest public utility is proposing a $216 million solar farm project in Kentucky atop a capped coal ash storage pit at a coal-fired power plant. The federal Tennessee Valley Authority voted Thursday to advance the initiative at Shawnee Fossil Plant in Paducah. The utility says it's a first-of-its-kind pilot project that would convert land used as a waste heap for the byproduct of burning coal for power into a solar farm that would help produce 100 megawatts. Officials say the model could ultimately be used at the utility's other closed coal ash sites. Still, environmental advocates note that TVA is falling short of the goal by President Joe Biden’s administration for a carbon-pollution-free energy sector by 2035.

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