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Tropical Storm Colin is bringing the threat of rain and high winds for a day or two during the holiday weekend to both North and South Carolina. Conditions are expected to improve by Mondays July 4th celebrations. Meanwhile, Tropical Storm Bonnie swept into Nicaragua on Friday, bringing the threat of flooding from heavy rain, while heading for a predicted fast crossing on the way to the Pacific and a possible strengthening into a hurricane. Bonnie came ashore on Nicaragua’s Caribbean coast about 75 miles (120 kilometers) south of Bluefields. Forecasters warn of the danger of significant flooding, with rains of up to 8 inches, and even more in isolated places.

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The Supreme Court's ruling on carbon emission controls on power plants this past week has cast light on the world of federal regulation. The ruling is seen as a potential blow to the fight against global warming, and it may have broader implications, too. Federal regulations run through American life, touching on everything we consume, the air we breathe, the water we drink. Regulation has become the go-to way for presidents to make policy when they can’t get Congress to pass a law, as on climate change. Barack Obama and Donald Trump did it, and so does Joe Biden. But the court’s conservative majority said not so fast to Biden.

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The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that gave some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. A lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors that they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

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Medication abortions were the preferred method for ending pregnancy in the U.S. even before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. As more states seek abortion limits, demand is expected to grow. They involve using two prescription medicines days apart _ pills that can be taken at home or in a clinic. The drug mifepristone is taken first. It blocks the effects of the hormone progesterone, which is needed to sustain a pregnancy. Misoprostol is taken 24 to 48 hours later. It cause the womb to contract, expelling the pregnancy. Use of the pills has been increasing in recent years.

The fast-changing coronavirus has kicked off summer in the U.S. with lots of infections but relatively few deaths compared to its prior incarnations. COVID-19 is still killing hundreds of Americans each day, but for many people the virus is not nearly as dangerous as it was. It’s easy to feel confused by the mixed picture: Repeat infections are increasingly likely, and a sizeable share of those infected will face the lingering symptoms of long COVID-19. Yet, the stark danger of death has diminished for many people. How long the interlude will last is impossible to know. A new more dangerous variant could be around the corner.

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Tourism is booming again in France, and so is COVID-19. French government officials have “invited” or “recommended” people to go back to using face masks but stopped short of renewing restrictions that would scare visitors away or revive protests. From Paris commuters to tourists on the French Riviera, many people seem to welcome the government’s light touch, while some worry that required prevention measures may be needed. Infections are rising across Europe and the United States, but government data shows France had nearly 1,000 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 per day over the past two weeks. Local officials are contemplating new measures, including indoor mask mandates, but nothing that would potentially curb economic activity.

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Pope Francis is urging the people and leaders of Congo and South Sudan to “turn a page” and forge new paths of reconciliation, peace and development. Francis issued a video message on the day he had planned to begin a weeklong pilgrimage to the two African countries. He canceled the trip last month because of knee pain that makes walking and standing difficult. In the message delivered Saturday, Francis said he was “greatly disappointed” by the turn of events and promised to reschedule “as soon as possible.” He sent his No. 2, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, to visit both Congo and South Sudan on the days the pope was supposed to have been there.

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Fearing Russia might cut off natural gas supplies, the head of Germany’s regulatory agency for energy is calling on residents to save energy and to prepare for winter, when use increases. Federal Network Agency President Klaus Mueller urged property owners to have their gas boilers and radiators checked and adjusted to maximize their efficiency. Mueller told the Funke Mediengruppe, a German newspaper and magazine publisher. on Saturday that residents need to use the 12 weeks before cold weather sets in to get ready. He says families should start talking now about “whether every room needs to be set at its usual temperature in the winter, or whether some rooms can be a little colder.”

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Russian forces are pounding the city of Lysychansk and its surroundings in an all-out attempt to seize the last stronghold of resistance in eastern Ukraine’s Luhansk province. The regional governor said Saturday that Russians "opened fire from all available kinds of weapons” in the last day. Ukrainian fighters have spent weeks trying to defend the city and to keep it from falling to Russia, as neighboring Sievierodonetsk did a week ago. Luhansk and neighboring Donetsk are the two provinces that make up the Donbas region, where Russia has focused its offensive since the spring. Pro-Russia separatists have held portions of both provinces since 2014, and Moscow recognizes all of Luhansk and Donetsk as sovereign republics.

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A Virgin Orbit rocket carrying seven U.S. Defense Department satellites has been launched from a special Boeing 747 flying off the Southern California coast. The modified jumbo jet took off Friday night from Mojave Air and Space Port in the Mojave Desert and released the rocket over the Pacific Ocean northwest of Los Angeles. The launch was procured by the U.S. Space Force for a Defense Department test program. The seven payloads will conduct various experiments. It was Virgin Orbit’s first night launch.

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Australia’s new government is putting climate change at the top of its legislative agenda when Parliament sits next month for the first time since the May 21 election, with bills to enshrine a cut in greenhouse gas emissions and make electric cars cheaper. Minister for Climate Change and Energy Chris Bowen told the National Press Club on Wednesday a bill will be introduced to commit Australia to reducing its emissions by 43% below 2005 levels by 2030 when Parliament sits on July 26. Another bill would abolish import tariffs and taxes for electric vehicles that are cheaper than a luxury car threshold. Bowen says legislating the 43% target would create greater confidence.

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Abortion, guns and religion _ a major change in the law in any one of these areas would have made for a fateful Supreme Court term. In its first full term together, the court’s conservative majority ruled in all three and issued other significant decisions limiting the government’s regulatory powers. And it has signaled no plans to slow down. With three appointees of former President Donald Trump in their 50s, the six-justice conservative majority seems poised to keep control of the court for years to come, if not decades. Its remaining opinions issued, the court began its summer recess Thursday, and the justices will next return to the courtroom in October.

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The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that had given some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. An lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors across Texas had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

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County election officials wrapped up a two-day statewide recount of ballots in the Nevada GOP primary for governor on Friday and the outcome did not appear to change, showing second-place finisher Joey Gilbert losing to Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo in a crowded field. Gilbert has said he did not expect the results to change much but sought the recount to challenge the results of the election in court. He paid $190,960 for the recount, which took clerks in all 17 counties two days to perform. The state's two largest counties, Clark and Washoe, confirmed that Lombardo had beaten Gilbert.

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Three Kentucky law enforcement officers were killed when a man opened fire on police attempting to serve a warrant at a home in eastern Kentucky. Police took 49-year-old Lance Storz into custody late Thursday night after an hourslong standoff at a home in Allen, a small town in the hills of Appalachia. An emergency management official was also injured and a police dog was killed. Floyd County Sheriff John Hunt told reporters that the responding officers encountered “pure hell” when they arrived on the scene, saying the had “no chance.” Storz was arraigned Friday and jailed on a $10 million bond.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom has pardoned a former inmate who received a life sentence when she was a teenager for killing her former pimp. It’s the final step in an official redemption that has spanned more than a decade and three governors of both political parties. Hers was among nearly three dozen such pardons and clemencies Friday that also affected younger and older offenders. Sara Kruzan was 16 when she killed George Gilbert Howard in a Riverside motel room. Kruzan eventually earned support from state lawmakers and reform groups seeking to soften harsh life sentences for those who committed their crimes as juveniles.

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The Golden State Warriors were determined to keep their winning roster together to chase another championship — to make a run at a repeat.As the NBA’s free agency period began, Golden State retained center Kevon Looney when he agreed to a $25.5 million, three-year contract, but lost several other key faces.The reigning champs lost guard Gary Payton II to the Portland Trail Blazers on a $28 million, three-year contract and saw Otto Porter Jr.’s departure to the Toronto Raptors.

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The North Carolina General Assembly has wrapped up its chief work session for the year. It adjourned on Friday after finalizing proposed state budget adjustments for the new fiscal year and crossing off other must-do legislation. The budget bill headed to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper, who must decide whether to sign it, veto it or let it become law. More than 30 Democrats joined all Republicans on Friday in voting for the spending measure. Some big policy matters like Medicaid expansion, medical marijuana and sports betting remain unresolved or were thwarted during the six-week session. The legislature could consider any Cooper vetoes in a few weeks.

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The United States qualified for its first Olympic men's soccer tournament since 2008 when the Americans beat Honduras 3-0 at San Pedro Sula in the semifinals of the Under-20 championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean. Paxten Aaronson of the Philadelphia Union, a brother of Leeds midfielder Brenden Aaronson, scored in the third minute. Alejandro Alvarado added a goal in the 23rd, and Quinn Sullivan in the 43rd as the U.S. earned a berth in the 16-nation field. Olympic men’s soccer is limited to players under 23, with each nation allowed three wild cards over the limit.

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Some Hawaii residents, including Native Hawaiians and military families, say an investigation blaming a water contamination crisis on shoddy management and human error doesn’t help restore their trust in the U.S. Navy. Navy spouse Lauren Wright says her family continues avoiding water in their military home because she doesn't trust that it's safe. The leak poisoned thousands of people and forced military families to evacuate their homes for hotels. A Navy investigation released Thursday blamed the water crisis on shoddy management and human error.  The report listed a cascading series of mistakes from May through November 2021 when fuel got into a drinking water well.

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The ex-boyfriend of a New York City woman shot dead Wednesday as she pushed their infant daughter in a stroller has been arrested and charged with killing her. Police said 22-year-old Isaac Argro was arrested Friday. Slain mother Azsia Johnson’s family identified Argro as the baby’s father and said he routinely abused Johnson, beating her during her pregnancy and threatening to kill her. Argro is charged with murder and criminal possession of a weapon, police Commissioner Keechant Sewell said. Information on a lawyer who could speak on his behalf was not immediately available. Johnson was 20. Her 3-month-old daughter was not hurt, but was taken to a hospital for medical evaluation.

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